CA Title 24 Quick Reference: Plug Load Control – When Do You Need It?

This may not be the most popular topic but with the new 2016 version of Title 24 code there are exciting and important changes to discuss. The requirements for plug load control have remained rather the same, with a few major changes.

The biggest change for plug load control is the requirements in alterations. Alterations section 141.0(b)2 has a new subsection P (141.0(b)2P) that covers Electrical power distribution requirements in alterations. 141.0(b)2 Piv states that “Circuit Controls for 120-Volt Receptacles and Controlled Receptacles. For entirely new or complete replacement of electrical power distribution systems, the entire system shall meet the applicable requirements of Section 130.5(d).” The CEC has confirmed that this means that receptacle control is only required in alterations when the entire electrical distribution is replaced. Note, if replacing the entire distribution system, then all connected receptacle loads must meet the requirements of 130.5(d).

The areas/spaces where plug load controls are required are similar but listed with broadened terms. Private offices and open offices have been changed to Office Areas, to include any space that has office related functions being performed. This includes any room or area of a building in CBC Group B Occupancy where business, clerical or professional activities are conducted, including quiet rooms, warehouses, etc., where these functions are also performed. “Reception lobbies” was changed to Lobbies to include all lobbies within a building or space. The term Kitchenette was broadened to Kitchen Areas as to include any space within a building where there are cooking facilities or where food is prepared. Conference Rooms and Copy Rooms have remained unchanged. Hotel and motel guest rooms maintain the same requirement to control half of the receptacles using a captive keycard, occupancy sensing control, or automatic controls that switch the power off no longer than 30 minutes after the guestroom has been vacated.

The requirements for plug load control are still to install a control system: that can automatically shut off the lighting when the space is typically unoccupied, with an automatic holiday shut-off and maximum 2-hour override. At least one controlled receptacle must be installed within 6 feet of an uncontrolled receptacle or split wire the receptacles to provide at least one controlled and one uncontrolled receptacle. Modular furniture in open office areas are to have at least one controlled receptacle installed at each workstation. Provide controlled receptacles or circuits with a permanent and durable marking that differentiates them from other uncontrolled receptacles or circuits.

Be sure to check out nLight’s nPP20 PL that controls a full 20 amp receptacle circuit and gives you peace of mind when controlled receptacles are required.

https://www.acuitybrands.com/products/detail/441248/nLight/nPP20-PL/Plug-Load-Control-Power-Pack

CA Title 24 2016 Quick Reference: Local Manual Control

Where do you put light switches for spaces that are open to the public like corridors, retail spaces, lobbies, restrooms, arenas, etc? These can be locked devices, placed within view of the lighting, or controls capable of annunciating the space that is being controlled. You can use a nPOD KEY, a keyed digital dimming switch, a nPODM decora digital dimming switch, or best of all, a nPOD GFX a 16 channel single gang touchscreen dimming controller with custom digital labeling. Read on for the specific requirements and solutions by area.

With the enforcement of 2016 T24 code, there have been a lot of inquiries surrounding the changes to local manual control requirements. Per 130.1(a), it is a requirement to provide manual control that is readily accessible and located within the same room or area. The exceptions provided allow for: areas to have lighting control that is within view of the lighting (or illuminated area) or controls that annunciate the area being illuminated; and to have the manual control not accessible to unauthorized personnel.

The areas that allow for controls to be within view or annunciated are malls and atria, auditorium areas, retail merchandise sales areas, wholesale showroom areas, commercial and industrial storage areas, general commercial and industrial work areas, convention centers, and arenas. The areas that allow for controls that are not accessible to unauthorized personnel are public restrooms with two or more stalls, parking areas, stairwells, and corridors. What does having controls not accessible to unauthorized personnel entail? The CEC accepts using a standard switch within a locked enclosure, a keyed switch, a switch located within an inaccessible area with a view of the lighting or illuminated area or using a switch with the controlled area being annunciated.

Per 130.1(a)4, General lighting shall be separately controlled from other lighting systems in the area so additional switches/controls are needed if providing additional types of lighting.

Note, the requirement for dimmable fixtures to be controlled by a dimming switch that can control the fixture through all of the required steps of Table 130.1-A has moved from the Area Control requirements section to section 130.1(b)3.

T24 Compliant Control Typicals:

SDLA:  https://www.sandiegolighting.com/controls-typicals/

T24 Compliant Control Systems:

nLight:   https://www.acuitybrands.com/products/controls/nlight

nLight AIR:  https://www.acuitybrands.com/products/controls/nlightair

Fresco:  https://www.acuitybrands.com/products/controls/fresco

LC&D – Blue Box:  https://www.acuitybrands.com/products/controls/blue-box

XPoint Wireless:  https://www.acuitybrands.com/products/controls/xpoint-wireless

EchoFlex: http://www.echoflexsolutions.com/

Designer Lighting Luncheon: Eureka Lighting Takes the Stage

Is there really a better way to spend your lunch hour then discussing the latest “hot topics” in lighting? We don’t think so. Specifiers, designers, engineers and architects in the lighting industry, joined us for the third installment of our designer luncheon series on May 24th at the Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens in Liberty Station. Stone brewing was a great location to host over 40 attendees, who engaged with a presentation and networking opportunities after enjoying a delicious lunch of steak, potatoes and organic greens, served buffet style.

We were lucky to have Eureka Lighting’s very own Director of Sales, Scott Spence and California District Sales Manager, Robert Ayala host the event, alongside our spec team. The duo gave the attendees insight into the many award-winning Eureka products and their vast capabilities. We were particularly impressed with the Matrix, an innovation in acoustic lighting, and the Flynn. Both of which won 2017 Product Innovation  Awards. Attendees had the opportunity to not only hear from the Eureka experts but witness the power of these products themselves, as we had multiple on display.

We love being able to provide the San Diego area with the latest in lighting innovation and networking opportunities. Rather than sitting in the drive-thru line on your lunch hour join us for our next designer luncheon, tentatively scheduled with Armstrong ceilings and JLC Tech t-bar lighting solutions! We have another show-stopping location in the works for you but keep checking in on our InstagramFacebook, and LinkedIn pages for more details as they become available!

Our events are always sure to fill up quickly so reserve your spot today. Anyone who specifies lighting in the San Diego/Imperial County areas is welcome to join us and can simply RSVP by emailing Amanda Ivko at amandai@sdltg.com!